How To Scaffold Your Home, Simply and Safely!

Sometimes, ladders just aren’t up to the job! If you are working alone, it is impossible to ensure your safety whilst perched precariously at the top of a narrow ladder. Do not despair; there is another, safer, option – the scaffolding system. As well as being more stable, you will have a wide platform from which to work from. It will save time and also enable you to do a better job. If you thought scaffolding was strictly for large buildings and construction sites, think again!

Where To Start

You can either buy or rent a scaffolding system.

How High?

You should measure the height of the area that you need to work on, use a reliable measuring system, and speak to the experts where you bought or hired the scaffolding from. You will need to calculate how many frames you need. A scaffolding frame is about five feet wide and five feet tall. Also remember that your platform needs to be about five or six feet below the area you are working on.

Assembly Time

So you’ve spoken to the experts and they have advised you of the correct scaffolding equipment. So what next? Firstly, you will need to assemble the base parts; this is achieved by placing two end frames together and connecting them with the correct screws. Ensure the base is rested on a solid surface, preferably wooden pads or concrete if available. After the base is assembled you can start on the planks and handrails.

Don’t Scrimp!

Do not be tempted to use some old planks you had lying around in the garden shed; you need strengthened wood for this job. You will risk a serious accident if you try to cut corners – be warned. You should also install guard rails to avoid a nasty fall, although you shouldn’t require them on the area that is facing the building.

Look Out!

A real danger when working on scaffolding is the possibility of falling objects, and the safety of people beneath them. You can avoid this by placing boards underneath the platform. These will catch any tools that become wayward.

Other Tips

Your scaffolding tower has been erected, with the help of a few friends, and now you are ready to start the work. Or are you? Here are a few extra ways to ensure your experience is a safe one:

• Construct a workstation – this allows you work extra hours without needing to climb down.
• Always lock the casters before you start to climb up the tower.
• Look out for any overhead wires nearby, they may be live electrical conductors.
• Take regular breaks, especially if you are working alone.
• Use a bucket to hoist required materials up into the workstation.
• Finally, if the job becomes too much, do not be afraid to call in the professionals!

Read more

Why Use a Scaffold Tower Instead of a Step Ladder?

Scaffolding towers have become very popular pieces of DIY equipment. All over the web you can see them advertised and hire companies are promoting them massively. Why have they become so popular and why can’t you just use a step ladder?

It is fair to say that many tasks that you can do in a scaffold tower – particularly the towers aimed at the DIY market – could be carried out on a step ladder so why should you bother with going to the hassle of setting up a scaffold tower? Here are just two situations where a scaffold tower is a much better option than a ladder:

Uneven Ground

Werner-D8200-EQ-Series-3

Using a step ladder safely on uneven ground is next to impossible – if you’re using it outside and the land slopes away from your property there is no way that you are going to be able to use a step ladder. However, you can get scaffold towers that have adjustable legs which allow up to 18″ of adjustment. Having this amount of adjustment means that you can safely set up the tower so that the platform you are working from is horizontal. Conversely to this I have never seen a ladder that has adjustable legs.

 

 

 

 

Trimming the top of a long tall hedge

hedgetrim3Trimming a hedge can be a painful exercise – you set up your ladder, put the secateurs in your pocket, cling on to the shears and climb up to the top of the ladder and then precariously lean to trim your hedge in to shape. The reality of this method is that you can only safely trim within a 3′ radius of the ladder – which is probably about a minutes work, after this you’re back down the ladder (with the tools), moving it along the length of the hedge and the process begins again…back up the ladder… Even basic scaffolding towers have a platform length of about 5′ so this give an obvious advantage straight away over using a step ladder – one climb up the scaffolding tower and you can easily trim 11′ of hedge. You can leave your tools at the top whilst you climb down and push the tower along the length of the hedge.

You may argue in both of these situations that it seems like a lot of effort to go to to setup a scaffold tower to trim a hedge or clear out some guttering. The reality is though that these scaffold towers come in kits that are so easy to assemble that the time it takes you to put the tower together will be far less than the time taken to go up and down a ladder 50 times.

Contact Alloy Access for more information on scaffolding towers.

Read more

Why Use a Scaffold Tower Instead of a Step Ladder?

Scaffolding towers have become very popular pieces of DIY equipment. All over the web you can see them advertised and hire companies are promoting them massively. Why have they become so popular and why can’t you just use a step ladder?

It is fair to say that many tasks that you can do in a scaffold tower – particularly the towers aimed at the DIY market – could be carried out on a step ladder so why should you bother with going to the hassle of setting up a scaffold tower? Here are just two situations where a scaffold tower is a much better option than a ladder:

 

Uneven Ground

Werner-D8200-EQ-Series-3

Using a step ladder safely on uneven ground is next to impossible – if you’re using it outside and the land slopes away from your property there is no way that you are going to be able to use a step ladder. However, you can get scaffold towers that have adjustable legs which allow up to 18″ of adjustment. Having this amount of adjustment means that you can safely set up the tower so that the platform you are working from is horizontal. Conversely to this I have never seen a ladder that has adjustable legs.

 

 

 

Trimming the top of a long tall hedge

hedgetrim3Trimming a hedge can be a painful exercise – you set up your ladder, put the secateurs in your pocket, cling on to the shears and climb up to the top of the ladder and then precariously lean to trim your hedge in to shape. The reality of this method is that you can only safely trim within a 3′ radius of the ladder – which is probably about a minutes work, after this you’re back down the ladder (with the tools), moving it along the length of the hedge and the process begins again…back up the ladder… Even basic scaffolding towers have a platform length of about 5′ so this give an obvious advantage straight away over using a step ladder – one climb up the scaffolding tower and you can easily trim 11′ of hedge. You can leave your tools at the top whilst you climb down and push the tower along the length of the hedge.

 

You may argue in both of these situations that it seems like a lot of effort to go to to setup a scaffold tower to trim a hedge or clear out some guttering. The reality is though that these scaffold towers come in kits that are so easy to assemble that the time it takes you to put the tower together will be far less than the time taken to go up and down a ladder 50 times.

 

Contact Alloy Access for more information on scaffolding towers.

Read more
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